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The Difference Between a Vision Screening and a Comprehensive Eye Exam

Submitted by Karen Saland on Sun 05/12/2019 - 03:32

Comprehensive Eye ExamHaving your eyes checked on a regular basis is one of the best things you can do to safeguard your vision. Because your eye health is very important no matter your age, it is important for both adults and children to have a comprehensive eye exam at least once every year.

Comprehensive Eye Exams

A comprehensive eye exam involves a careful and thorough evaluation of the different aspects of your visual health. We will assess your eye structures and their respective functions. The main objective is to identify eye conditions and render necessary treatment as soon as possible.

Along with testing to see if you need new glasses or contact lenses, tests are performed to see if there are any signs of eye disease such as glaucoma or macular degeneration which have little or no symptoms until significant damage has already occurred.

Besides your eye health, your overall bodily health can be detected through your eyes as well. A comprehensive eye exam also includes examinations of the retina, cornea, blood vessels and nerves for any signs that might signify the onset of tumors, cancer, high blood pressure and diabetes, among other conditions that can be first detected in the eyes.

Comprehensive eye exams can only be performed by an optometrist or ophthalmologist. These professionals have undergone many years of study and training, enabling them to make an accurate diagnosis.

Vision Screenings

Unlike the in-depth information acquired through a comprehensive eye exam, a vision screening is a very quick and simple way to test if there are any obvious indications of a vision or eye problem. A vision screening program is often included as part of children’s school requirements. It involves a brief and general evaluation of your eyes, looking for signs of changes or irregularities. If any warning signs are found during a vision screening, a comprehensive eye exam for a more in-depth visual assessment is typically recommended. Vision screenings can be performed by a nurse, general practitioner or even a volunteer. Vision screenings, though a great surface level way to make sure nothing is obviously wrong, should never replace comprehensive eye exams.

To learn more about vision screenings or to schedule a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Saland in Dallas, contact Saland Vision at 214-691-8000 or salandvision.com today.